Reaching the Next Generation

I received my copy of Rev! magazine yesterday, and as usual I skimmed through it all on the first day.  I actually receive a bulk order of 8 copies because of my work with Group Publishing and their Church Volunteer Central workshops.  I strategically drop copies into the boxes of those who need them.

There was an interesting article about the changes that twentysomethings are asking for in churches today.  This is a very real issue for us because of the make up of our neighborhood.  Within a 2 mile radius, there are 200,000 people.  66,000 of them are under 30 years old.  For a long time, we’ve discussed how to reach out to that group of people and be effective.  After another new person placed membership last week and three the week before, that makes 20 young singles in the last 6 months that we’ve added.  It seems as if God is ready for us to have them whether we are or not.

I was delighted to find the following seven "wants" in the Rev! article:

  1. They want to participate in a "gathering" experience.  "Gathering" being a community environment and not the typical man-up-front, everyone else watches.
  2. They want to share stories.
  3. They want authenticity, not perfection from leaders.
  4. They want to be taught the whole of Scripture in its historical context.
  5. They’d like to "belong before they believe".
  6. They want team leadership, not celebrity leadership.
  7. They don’t want to compartmentalize their lives.

For those that have looked into post-modernism, it is pretty clear that the loose, intangibles of that thinking type are beginning to take hold in more tangible ways.  The desire for experience, for authenticity, and dislike of hierarchical leadership are prevalent in most of these areas.

So, how many leaders out there are ready to be authentic instead of perfect?  I know I am! 

10 Responses to Reaching the Next Generation

  1. bnicklaus says:

    more accurately,
    how many are ready to be authentic instead of phony/unauthentic?

    perfect is not an option

  2. bnicklaus says:

    more accurately,
    how many are ready to be authentic instead of phony/unauthentic?

    perfect is not an option

  3. bradpalmore says:

    Sure, we say being perfect is not an option, but how many of us try to deny that fact?

  4. Stoogelover says:

    I’ve been contented just to be RIGHT! On everything. 🙂

  5. Stoogelover says:

    I’ve been contented just to be RIGHT! On everything. 🙂

  6. Maikon Borba says:

    Hello Brad!

    It’s been a little while since I last came here…
    Very cool these new features you have. Now we can see whether the person uses Mac or PC, IE or FireFox and also where he or she is from!!
    Have a blessed snowy day!!
    See you Wednesday!

  7. Maikon Borba says:

    Hello Brad!

    It’s been a little while since I last came here…
    Very cool these new features you have. Now we can see whether the person uses Mac or PC, IE or FireFox and also where he or she is from!!
    Have a blessed snowy day!!
    See you Wednesday!

  8. Pete Grant says:

    Being ‘authentic’ is very messy! You have to be ready to admit to your faults, doubts, and limitations. Not only does this mess with the whole “leader/minister” identity, but it also forces you to confront these truths on a personal level. On the one hand, it’s scary. On the other hand, it is quite freeing!!

    Pete Grant
    Minister/Tattoo artist for Sacred Ink

  9. Pete Grant says:

    Being ‘authentic’ is very messy! You have to be ready to admit to your faults, doubts, and limitations. Not only does this mess with the whole “leader/minister” identity, but it also forces you to confront these truths on a personal level. On the one hand, it’s scary. On the other hand, it is quite freeing!!

    Pete Grant
    Minister/Tattoo artist for Sacred Ink

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