Bibles and Browsers

At some point last night while working on a problem Patrick Mead was having on his blog (it’s fixed… I think), I realized an odd similarity that exists between web browsers and Bible translations.  We all have our favorites.  Some prefer the NIV, some the KJV, NLT, NASB, RSV, etc.  Some prefer Firefox, others Internet Explorer, and others like Safari, Camino, or Opera.  It is getting to where there are almost as many web browsers available as there are Bible versions.

Where the oddest part of this similarity lies is in the process of choosing which version we’ll use as our primary.  Sometimes we spend time with the options, looking at the way certain versions handle the translation of specific ideas and how they structure the sentences grammatically.  We make further selection based on tools and features a Bible offers, whether it has a concordance or study notes.  Sometimes, though, our choices are not made with such a level of thought and reflection.  Sometimes we chose a particular Bible translation by default when one was given to us, maybe as a child.  At other times the choice is more passive and comes in the form of sticking with what we are comfortable with and have used for a long period of time.

The reason I thought of this similarity is because of the problems that exist with the web browser Internet Explorer.  It is notorious for butchering content on web sites and munging the layout that web designers work so hard to put in place (and, by the way, was the cause of the problem on Patrick Mead’s blog).  Why do people use Internet Explorer?  Some have carefully decided that the features and qualities of IE meet their needs the most.  Others because they’ve been using it forever and are uncomfortable with trying something new.  Others use IE because it came on their computer and so by default they’ve adopted it into their internet experience.

So, to conclude a very strange post that mixes two very different worlds with each other, I have a piece of advice for all users of the Bible and the internet.  Broaden your horizons by consulting with a few different versions of either.  If you count electronic versions of the Bible, I have access to over 50 translations (I only use a couple, and the freeware version of the Living Oracles for PalmPilot is a hoot.).  I get a better understanding of the text when I look at how different translators handle the text.  Web browsers are the same way.  I have four currently installed on my computer and I consult each of them at any given time, especially when there is a problem or when something doesn’t show up correctly. 

My current favorites?  New International Version for the Bible and Firefox for web browser.  The ultimate kick: Viewing the New International Version at www.biblegateway.com using Firefox.   

18 Responses to Bibles and Browsers

  1. Stoogelover says:

    Can’t tell you the number of people I’ve encouraged to switch over to Firefox. The number who have made the change, that I know of? 0 Maybe we could use the line the KJV hardliners use, that God spoke in King James Enlish. We could say if God had a computer, it would be a Mac and his browser would NOT be Explorer. If Revelation were written today, I’m sure Explorer would be used as a symbol of evil.

  2. Stoogelover says:

    Can’t tell you the number of people I’ve encouraged to switch over to Firefox. The number who have made the change, that I know of? 0 Maybe we could use the line the KJV hardliners use, that God spoke in King James Enlish. We could say if God had a computer, it would be a Mac and his browser would NOT be Explorer. If Revelation were written today, I’m sure Explorer would be used as a symbol of evil.

  3. Randy Wray says:

    Firefox yes! The NIV (Nearly Inspired Version) no! New Century Version all the way! We may have to withdraw fellowship from you.

  4. Randy Wray says:

    Firefox yes! The NIV (Nearly Inspired Version) no! New Century Version all the way! We may have to withdraw fellowship from you.

  5. Meowmix says:

    Man, Randy, I hate to hear that. I LOVE my NIV. Guess I’m on my way out, too!! 🙂

  6. Meowmix says:

    Brad, why do you not have a headache with all that technological stuff swimming around in your head all day? I’ve been working on a computer at work for years, and I don’t understand half of the words you used! I do know about Explorer. It’s on our computers. I didn’t know there was anything else! 🙂

  7. Meowmix says:

    Brad, why do you not have a headache with all that technological stuff swimming around in your head all day? I’ve been working on a computer at work for years, and I don’t understand half of the words you used! I do know about Explorer. It’s on our computers. I didn’t know there was anything else! 🙂

  8. bradpalmore says:

    The problem is that the analogy more closely fits that IE is the KJV. It’s been around the longest, it’s what we’re used to, it’s what my father browsed with and if it is good enough for him it’s good enough for me.

  9. bradpalmore says:

    Don’t listen to him. NIV is still perfectly fine. He’s just anti-popular. Lest I turn this into a debate about versions, I’ll stop with that. He’d probably come up with good reasons to which I would respond with comments about his hairline.

  10. bradpalmore says:

    Keep my number. Once you get transitioned into retarded…er…retired life we’ll get you taken care of.

    As for headaches, how do you know I don’t have them?

  11. Meowmix says:

    You probably had it right the first time!

    I will definitely take your phone number home with me. You’ll be sick of me before it’s over with.

    I’m not even going to touch that line about Randy’s hairline!

  12. Stoogelover says:

    Just for the record: New Living Translation. (Large print!)

  13. Stoogelover says:

    Just for the record: New Living Translation. (Large print!)

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